The measure of an economy is money. A large economy has a larger supply of money than does a small economy. Therefore, to grow an economy requires a growing supply of money. Every form of money is a form of debt. Therefore, a growing economy requires a growing supply of debt.
Federal Deficit Problem
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"When the obvious answers don't work, the correct answers will be counterintuitive."


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     Bias is a belief that prevents objective consideration of an issue. We all have biases. We believe things, without having evidence.
    Biases can be very powerful. When we have one, we tend to be absolutely, positively sure we are right, even when evidence points in the opposite direction.
    How else can you explain the widespread belief that taking money out of an economy through increased taxes and/or decreased federal spending (known as a federal surplus) will help that economy grow?

    FREE MONEY discusses the most common biases about our economy and why we have those biases, and it identifies the counterintuitive truths. For instance: You probably share this very common bias: A federal surplus is financially more prudent than a federal defict.
    You believe this because you "know" that you would rather have a surplus than a deficit in your own bank account. And you assume the federal government is the same. It just seems to "make sense."
    But do you have any facts to back your intuition? Undoubtedly not, because the facts show:
--Every depression in our history began with a series of federal surpluses
--The most recent recession began with the Clinton surpluses.
--Every recovery began with a series of federal deficits, including the most recent recovery.
--The federal government never has had difficulty paying its debts, not even during the darkest days of the Great Depression, and not during the largest federal deficits in our history.
--A growing economy requires a growing supply of money; Deficits are the way, the only way, the federal government creates money.
    Those are the facts, yet you feel something must be wrong. You have been taught that debt is bad and surplus is good. You would prefer to rely on your intuition, rather than trust the facts. The facts can be twisted, but your intuition always, always is sound. That is the way we have evolved.
    And that is why you should read FREE MONEY. Not only will it show you the facts, but it will show you how to understand and eventually, to believe them.
           "How else can you explain the widespread belief that taking money out of an economy through increased taxes and/or decreased federal spending (known as a federal surplus) will help that economy grow?"
What does this logical progression tell you?
*A large economy needs a larger supply of money than does a small economy.
*Therefore, a growing economy needs a growing supply of money.
*All money is a form of debt.
*Therefore, a growing economy requires a growing supply of debt.
*U. S. Federal Debt is the safest, most controllable form of debt, because the federal government, alone among borrowers, never will default.
*Thus, there is no federal debt or deficit problem, and a balanced federal budget guarantees recession, and depression.

Enjoy the truth. There is a national debt solution. The federal budget deficit is necessary. The US national debt is a synonym for "money."

More Articles by Rodger Malcolm Mitchell


Medicare: A Consumer Problem

Read Letters to the Media

US National Debt is $9 Trillion!


To learn more about FREE MONEY please click the cover.

For those who want a balanced budget, here is a history lesson:
1817-1821: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 29%. Depression began 1819.
1823-1836: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 99%. Depression began 1837.
1852-1857: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 59%. Depression began 1857.
1867-1873: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 27%. Depression began 1873.
1880-1893: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 57%. Depression began 1893.
1920-1930: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 36%. Depression began 1929.
1998-2001: U. S. Federal Debt reduced 9%.   Recession began 2001

CONTENTS OF THIS WEB SITE:

1. Stagflation
2. Federal Budget Deficit
3. Social Security and Medicare Solutions
4. National Debt Letters
5. Federal Deficit Solution
6. Concord Coalition.
7. Balanced Federal Budget
8. Federal Deficit Problem
9. Federal Government Budget
10. US National Debt
11. National Debt Solution
12. A Child In Arms
13. Inflation and Stagflation
14. Glossary of Economic Terms Debt, Money, Deficit, Spend, Owe
15. U.S. National Debt
16. US National Debt Clock
The Interest Rate Fallacy | Social Security Solutions And Reform | Medicare Solutions And Reform | Solutions To Our Economic Problems | Recessions, Depressions, Inflations, Stagflations: Causes and Cures | Federal Debt of the U.S. | Why We Need The Federal Budget Deficit | Stagflation: What It Is And How It is Prevented And Cured | Interesting Letters To The Media | Is There A Federal Deficit Solution? | Should We Have A Balanced Federal Budget? | What Is The Federal Deficit Problem? | How The Federal Government Budget Affects The Economy | A Discussion Of The US National Debt | The National Debt Solution | Short Stories: A Child In Arms | Glossary of Economic Terms Debt, Money, Deficit, Spend, Owe | US National Debt Clock | The Solution to Inflation and Stagflation | What Is Pseudoeconomics?   | How Is Money Supply Like The Weather? | Do Low Interest Rates Help The Economy? | The Solution to Federal Tax Reform | What Is The Relationship Between Gold and Money? | Why Do You Pay Taxes? | Social Security Reform | Does Federal Debt Cause Inflation? | The 5 Myths That Damage Our Economy | 10 Reasons to Eliminate FICA | GETROYS | Rodger M. Mitchell -- Ideas |